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THIS IS ONE “ASIA” DESTINATION YOU DON’T NEED!

July 2, 2012

ASIA (AUTOIMMUNE (AUTO-INFLAMMATORY) SYNDROME INDUCED BY ADJUVANTS) EXCERPT FROM FORTHCOMING BOOK

Between the above “ASIA” and Phuket I’ll take the island destination any day where the only threat to your health is a hangover and sunburn. This syndrome assembles a spectrum of immune-mediated diseases triggered by an adjuvant stimulus. An adjuvant is a substance used to enhance or magnify an antigen-specific immune response. All modern vaccines contain adjuvants such as aluminum. There is now a growing fear that the common adjuvants used in vaccines are themselves a cause of numerous chronic debilitating diseases such as a new syndrome coined in 2010 by a French myopathologist called macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF). Recently muscle biopsy at injection sites of vaccinated patients with a constellation of symptoms such as severe fatigue and muscle/joint aches revealed nanoparticles of Al contained within the cytoplasm of macrophages a major immune cell type typically seen in inflammatory conditions.

Recently in 2010 researchers Y. Shoenfield et al have reviewed the current data supporting a common denominator in four seemingly unrelated conditions: siliconosis from breast implants and the like, Gulf war syndrome (GWS), the macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome (MMF) and post-vaccination phenomena. All were linked with previous exposure to an adjuvant. Furthermore, these four diseases share a similar complex of signs and symptoms which further support a common denominator.[1]

The use of medical adjuvants has become common practice and substances such as aluminum adjuvant are added to most human and animal vaccines, while the adjuvant silicone is extensively used for breast implants and cosmetic procedures. Furthermore, ‘hidden adjuvants’ such as infectious material or house molds have also been associated with different immune mediated conditions. Formerly, adjuvants were thought to pose little or no independent threat. Alas, studies of animal models and humans demonstrated the ability of some of them to inflict autoimmunity and immune-mediated diseases by themselves.[2]

Researchers have suggested that several other distinct diseases may be induced by vaccine adjuvants such as polymyalgia rheumatica in association with the flu vaccine, patients developing SLE following immunization with the human papilloma vaccine, and 93 American patients diagnosed with immune-mediated conditions following inoculation with hepatitis B vaccine. Even though different autoimmune diseases were diagnosed, many manifestations were common to all patients and 86% of them fulfilled the criteria for ASIA.[3]

In addition they review the association between pediatric vaccines and the various mechanisms of aluminum toxicity and Crohn’s disease. In a separate Shoenfeld article the use of adjuvants, ASIA, and the possible contribution of vaccines in the development of chronic fatigue syndrome is discussed.[4]

In the above study the authors mention that plenty of clinical data has been presented in support of an association between adjuvants and immune-mediated diseases but providing proof of causality has remained elusive. However, in this article two experimental models are portrayed, both of which prove the concept of autoimmunity induced by adjuvants. The authors conclude that this global view of ASIA probably represents only the tip of the iceberg. While encouraging physicians to report unusual vaccine related illnesses to obtain a better feel for the true prevalence of this disease. They feel that the role of adjuvants in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases can no longer be ignored, and the medical community must look towards producing safer adjuvants.


[1] Shoenfeld Y, Agmon-Levin N. ‘ASIA’ – autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

J Autoimmun. 2011 Feb;36(1):4-8. Epub 2010 Aug 13.

[2] (http://lup.sagepub.com/content/21/2/118.full) ·  N Agmon-Levin Lupus February 2012 vol. 21 no. 2 118-120. 07/02/2012

[3] IBID

[4] H. Rosenblum, Y. Shoenfeld. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
Volume 25, Issue 4 , Pages 851-863, December 2011

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